Stunning video shows beauty and sorrow of Australia’s outback river

news, national,

The magnificence of the Darling River really has to be seen to be believed. Nearly 1500 kilometres in length, it becomes Australia’s longest river system when it runs into the Murray at Wentworth in NSW. Its basin exists across state boundaries and is the lifeblood of communities in NSW, Queensland, Victoria and South Australia. It stretches across an area roughly three times the size of Germany. But the Darling is dying. Its poor health is a result of over-allocation of waters to northern irrigators, polluting runoff, and years of drought. The Forgotten River documentary (found above) is a collaboration from Canberra Times photographer Dion Georgopulous and national reporter John Hanscombe during a trip to Outback NSW to listen to the stories of the people of the Darling, or the Barka, as First Nations people know it. The video was edited by ACM group video journalist Emma Horn. The Forgotten River team, with Voice of Real Australia host, Tom Melville, wanted to take listeners and readers to the banks of the Darling River where, despite decades of neglect, the people refuse to give up fighting for the life of this national icon. Throughout 2019, the Darling River ceased to flow in many locations, leaving communities that rely on its flow at a loss. Thankfully, increased rainfall recently has improved the river’s flow and its overall health. After harrowing scenes of fish kills across Menindee’s lakes in 2019-2020, the lake system has now reached 100 per cent capacity. It’s an encouraging sign for the river system, but those who live on its banks are very aware, no amount of wishing will ever break the reality that bad times could arrive without warning. Listen to their story in their own words with our Voice of Real Australia podcast series. The documentary supports the Forgotten River podcast. A four-part podcast special and accompanying series of articles, photos and videos telling the stories of the Darling River and its people. Listen to the full story on our podcast. Search Forgotten River on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or your preferred app. You can also click here, or use the web player in this article. Read More from the Forgotten River team

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Stunning video shows beauty and sorrow of Australia’s outback river

/images/transform/v1/crop/frm/e5Qc2M5qQnfX3PTaVNk9Vy/22b43a22-5b02-4432-a489-84c090a0b427.png/r4_0_1916_1080_w1200_h678_fmax.jpg

Immerse yourself in the beauty of the Darling River, a forgotten place where the people are fighting to preserve their paradise.

news, national,

2021-09-18T06:30:00+10:00

https://players.brightcove.net/3879528182001/default_default/index.html?videoId=6272957641001

https://players.brightcove.net/3879528182001/default_default/index.html?videoId=6272957641001

Watch the Forgotten River documentary. Best experienced with sound turned on.

The magnificence of the Darling River really has to be seen to be believed.

Its basin exists across state boundaries and is the lifeblood of communities in NSW, Queensland, Victoria and South Australia. It stretches across an area roughly three times the size of Germany.

But the Darling is dying. Its poor health is a result of over-allocation of waters to northern irrigators, polluting runoff, and years of drought.

The Forgotten River documentary (found above) is a collaboration from Canberra Times photographer Dion Georgopulous and national reporter John Hanscombe during a trip to Outback NSW to listen to the stories of the people of the Darling, or the Barka, as First Nations people know it. The video was edited by ACM group video journalist Emma Horn.

The Forgotten River team, with Voice of Real Australia host, Tom Melville, wanted to take listeners and readers to the banks of the Darling River where, despite decades of neglect, the people refuse to give up fighting for the life of this national icon.

Throughout 2019, the Darling River ceased to flow in many locations, leaving communities that rely on its flow at a loss.

Thankfully, increased rainfall recently has improved the river’s flow and its overall health.

It’s an encouraging sign for the river system, but those who live on its banks are very aware, no amount of wishing will ever break the reality that bad times could arrive without warning.

Listen to the full story on our podcast. Search Forgotten River on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or your preferred app. You can also click here, or use the web player in this article.

Read More from the Forgotten River team

  • Listen to the Forgotten River above or find it on your favourite podcast player here.
  • Meet the team behind the Forgotten River here.
  • Find out more about the Murray-Darling here.

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